“Halt the Flow of Time” The awesome badness of Starcrash, 1978

Imperial Battleship, halt the flow of time.” Christopher Plummer says these immortal words of cheese in Starcrash 1978, which is the pinnacle of awesomeness in bad movies imitating Star Wars. He is the Emperor of the First Circle of the Universe, but he is the good guy. The Bad Guy is a Duke of some sort who thinks he is Ming the Merciless. What the other Circles of the Universe are we dont know. I cannot possibly describe how hilariously bad this movie is. Star Wars had come out and made more money than anybody could believe so a rash of bad sci fi tried to cash in. This movie alone survives and has gained cult status. There are so many blogs and reviews of it even now.

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They have no idea basically what they are doing, the special effects would embarrass the Ramsay Brothers horror outings, there is no story – well none that is not ripped off from Lucas – and everybody is having the time of their lives. There is even a lightsaber! And men’s hair from the 1970s which once seen can never be unseen. David Hasseldorf before he became Knight Rider and the beach guy, Plummer because he got a free trip to Rome out of it, and above all Caroline Munro who had just been a Bond girl and thought this would make her a star.

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Munro must be the only actress in the universe who could make Katrina Kaif look like a thespian but she does it. Easily. She has no idea she cant act, but she wears a bikini combat suit through most of the movie so who was complaining? In fact considering this movie came out in 78 one wonders if Lucas did not take segments from it also. The ice planet, the tribals carrying people suspended on poles, the chats and dances round fires and the gold bikini of Leia, they are all seen here first. Much food for thought, we have here… hmmm? The movie is easily available on Youtube so have a watch. It is two hours you will never get back, but so much hilarity too. People failing as they strive for success is the human condition. Somewhere in this mess, viewers seem to understand that, which is why they never allowed the movie to die.

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Oh and for those wondering how time is halted? A green ray comes out of the ship and everything is frozen for 3 minutes. After which all is back as before. Which violates so many laws of the universe except those of batshit insane nuttbaggery where it makes perfect sense. It is that kind of movie.starcrash2

 

Sri Guru Rohit Arya is the Founder of the Arya Yoga Sangha. He likes supremely bad movies which try hard, for if he attempted to make a movie the results would not be very different.

Dirt, Grit and Blood come to Star Wars with Rouge One

Rogue One may be the best made film in the entire Star Wars crowd. It is not the best film because it is merely telling a backstory, how the Alliance got the plans to the Death Star, though this movie pokes an Imperial Walker sized hole through New Hope’s claim that “Our scientists have analysed the plans of the Death Star and found a weakness.” No, this is the “Many Bothans died to get us this knowledge” story. And it is good. Nothing spectacular but good. This is the Deep Space Nine dirt and grit to the squeaky clean ethos of the tale. A man who gives the first warning is murdered in cold blood. So the universe is saved from the Death Star because the Rebels did not flinch from assassination of the innocent where needed. That is a big and extraordinary step forward.

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Felicity Jones carries on the tedious new feminist tradition of being the best and a natural leader because vagina. But unlike that clown in Force Awakens this girl at least has over a decade of training in how to be a bad ass. So we can overlook the twigs for arms and sticks for legs being somehow more dangerous than Bobba Fett. The strike team’s composition seems designed by a diversity officer in HR – Two types of Asians, one Latino, a magical black dude who is the mentor and who of course is the first to die – poor Forest Whittaker – several indeterminate species but always led by the pretty white girl who looks like she writes for the Huffington Post because they are the pinnacle of human potential, but let that be also. At least it was not Mad Maxipad.

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For this movie has Vader in it and that is always a good day. Not that whiny pussy Anakin but the Dark Lord himself. Somebody should make a prequel after Lucas is dead which shows that Vader was some other dude pretending to be Anakin because he inherited Padme’s estates or something. It simply does not make sense that a guy who could kick the Hulks ass started off as Anakin. Nobody develops so much awesome, even when all your limbs have been chopped off. There is not that much Force in the Universe – light or dark. Vader force chokes a flunky with pretensions, flips a guy into mid air with the force and slices him into two, and generally shows why the entire universe pees itself when they hear the rasping breaths. Whats not to like?

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Digitally reanimating Peter Cushing was a a bad bad idea however. The Grand Moff Tarkin was so cool he could order “Vader. release him” and and all the Dark Lord had to say was ” As you wish.” That guy looks like a zombie here. And so does Carrie Fisher getting one last shot at playing Leia when she was young. Ah digital botox, you raiser of false hopes you.
I rejoice to announce that the two sturdiest Star Wars cliche dialogues are present in full glory – “Let’s get out of here” and above all – “I have a bad feeling about this.” By now they have become such in jokes that the other characters in the movies shut down the second line before it is completed. So watch it only if you are a Star Wars junkie. I saw it in a completely empty hall in Navi Mumbai on December 22 2016 by the way.  The world has moved on obviously.

Sri Guru Rohit Arya is the founder of the Arya Yoga Sangha. He saw Star Wars when it first released and was called Star Wars not a stupid New Hope. He thinks Lucas has read too much Joseph Campbell and liked too much Leni Reifenstahl, but he is a genius maker of worlds anyway.

 

Two movies that should have been done by Peckinpah

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I saw White Hunter, Black Heart and The Last Stand recently. Both films are failures in creative terms. Both of them needed Peckinpah to really mine the gold that could have been discovered within. Sam had that knack. Eastwood never had the self-loathing and self doubt that plagued Peckinpah and White Hunter is probably his least interesting directorial effort when he was making a movie not a studio pleaser. The Last Stand is dreck but it needn’t have been. All things are better if you have somebody like Peckinpah.

 

 

The enduring legacy of the blood ballet meister just goes to show how much he impacted movies ,showed what is possible even in the tiredest genre. White Hunter should have been a great movie about obsession and the personal demons of creative men. Eastwood never gets to that core; it is Clint Eastwood pretending to be John Houston about to begin shooting The African Queen but more interested in bagging a tusker. Not a single person looks real in the movie. The casual racism that that prevalent was no longer public behavior and ethnic slurs are cast around more in a desperate attempt to shock and show how much more evolved we had all become. It simply does not work.

 

 

Star charisma is another thing that the movie inadvertently underlines. There are two actors who look and sound and move like Hepburn and Bogart. Nobody buys it. Cate Blancett is a star and she could bring out Hepburn in The Aviator. Eastwood is simply too dominant for anybody else to be believable. He is also not a man prone to self-flagellation or self-destructiveness, no matter the devastation he wreaks in other people lives. Peckinpah destroyed himself more than anything else and Houston barely kept it together. Clint gives a speech on why he needs to kill an elephant more than work on his movie. It is a great sin, one that you can get a license for, and therefore it needs to be done. That much emotional complexity, that much sense of sin and loathing has never come near Eastwood and it is a flat neutral scene instead of a great one.  Clint is a well documented asshole but in different ways from Sam and John and he cannot comprehend such foolishness in a guy who has everything. Eastwood was finally being recognized as a significant filmmaker when he made this film and critics were reluctant to disparage their new auteur.  Audiences however rejected it outright and it was one of his few real flops.

 

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The Last Stand is a very bad film indeed but it is a Peckinpah country film. A once hotshot lawman living out his days in irrelevance and disrespect in a border town;  Mexican drug lords, obtuse Government agencies, corruption and betrayal, messy love stories, lunatic characters helping the hero and also a Gatling gun. Peckinpah would have found a way to blend all of them together and for starters he would have got better actors. Forest Whittaker is slumming for a paycheck, Arnold is incredibly rusty and most of the cast are just bad actors. The director is Korean which may have provided a creative spark but no. Old Boy could only have been made in Korea but Peckinpah is the animating principle.  This movie simply does not have the emotional resonance or even exciting action such films need; it has Arnold running on empty trying to find a way back to stardom and relevance with one liners.  The script is just not good enough. The sheriff’s supposed trauma is a botched operation that crippled a friend and wiped out his team. In the climax he informs the villain “My honor is not for sale.”   What?!  Who said he was not honorable or had lost it? How is that line a culmination or resolution of what has been taking place? It is grossly sloppy. Peckinpah would have given us a harrowing film. As always it is the script and the director that determines a movie not the story, not the actors.

 

 

 

Rohit Arya is an Author, Yogi and Polymath, being a writer, a corporate trainer, a mythologist and a vibrant speaker.  He has written the first book on Vaastu to be published in the West, {translated into five European languages} the first book on Tarot to be published in India, co-authored a book on fire sacrifice, and is the creator of The Sacred India Tarot {82 card deck and book}. He was the Editor of The Leadership Review, and on the advisory panel of Indiayogi.com, the first spiritual portal in the country. Currently he is the Director of Pro-Factor, a leadership and change facilitation corporate training outfit. He has been an arts critic and socio-cultural commentator for over two decades. Rohit is also a Lineage Master in the Eight Spiritual Breaths system of Yoga. He founded the Arya Yoga Sangha and leads multiple meditation circles each week. The videos of his talks on various subjects can be found here http://www.youtube.com/user/TheAryayogi

 

His blogs can be accessed here

 

http://aryayogi.wordpress.com/

 

http://actpersistintensify.wordpress.com/

 

https://creativeaye.wordpress.com/

 

http://zestandgrit.wordpress.com/

 

 

Photo themes we are tired of seeing

Photos that once seemed gorgeous rapidly become tedious in our over-sharing digital times. Some of the major themes we could all jettison and be grateful for are suggested here. This must cease – for all our sakes

 

The Sunset

 

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For a combination of unsophistication, sentimentality and obviousness the sunset is the pinnacle. It never sets alas….

 

The Arizona rock swirls

 

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Yes, fabulous. We get it. Take a break now please. Ditto – deserts and dunes.

 

Tulip fields

 

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From the air or not.  There is only so much primary color elegance a human can take.

 

The Zen Stones

 

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When confronted with this ongoing fatuity I want to walk over and give this installation a good swift kick. It is incredible how easily this has degenerated into cliché and mental laziness. Here is an egregious culprit – with added sunset!

 

The Insect close up

 

massimo-tamajo13Uh huh. After the first ten they begin to stupefy. Dew covered insects are the new wrinkle on this.

 

 

Star trails

 

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This is the prime example of how too many cameras in the hands of too many people with internet access rendered what is beautiful into yawn inducers.

 

The landscape in reflection

 

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Where once is not enough.

 

 

 

The lonely boat

 

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Melancholia apparently is the aspiration here. And of course a sunset! If we see a photo of a boat with people in it, except on National Geographic, that is now a shock.

 

The rediscovery of linear perspective

 

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This is the most curious. Digital cameras seem to have suddenly enabled hordes of people to comprehend perspective. It appears to intoxicate them.

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It also leads to the depressing conclusion that art never really impacted people at large, for this was cutting edge consciousness for Filippo Brunelleschi (1377-1446), who was the first to articulate it. In 1435, Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472), provided the first theory of linear perspective in his book, On Painting.

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Since then artists have squeezed every last drop out of it, abandoned it, but amateur photographers in the 21st century are suddenly engaging with it. That Art moves at a speed wildly varying from the larger social consciousness is readily forgotten.

 

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Plus sunsets!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rohit Arya is an Author, Yogi and Polymath, being a writer, a corporate trainer, a mythologist and a vibrant speaker.  He has written the first book on Vaastu to be published in the West, {translated into five European languages} the first book on Tarot to be published in India, co-authored a book on fire sacrifice, and is the creator of The Sacred India Tarot {82 card deck and book}. He was the Editor of The Leadership Review, and on the advisory panel of Indiayogi.com, the first spiritual portal in the country. Currently he is the Director of Pro-Factor, a leadership and change facilitation corporate training outfit. He has been an arts critic and socio-cultural commentator for over two decades. Rohit is also a Lineage Master in the Eight Spiritual Breaths system of Yoga. He leads the Ka Sangha meditation group, as well as The Integral Space meditation circle each week. The videos of his talks on various subjects can be found here http://www.youtube.com/user/TheAryayogi

 

 

 

His blogs can be accessed here

 

http://aryayogi.wordpress.com/

 

 

http://actpersistintensify.wordpress.com/

 

 

https://creativeaye.wordpress.com/

 

 

http://zestandgrit.wordpress.com/

 

Has a movie remake ever been better than the original?

Christoph Waltz asked this question on a show once, intuiting a major difference between theatre and cinema. I can think of almost no examples.

 

True Grit with Jeff Bridges is certainly better than the Wayne version. Mother India was much superior to Aurat, but Mehboob Khan did both iterations.   Other than that? It is remarkably surprising how much worse remakes are than sequels which steadily improve. The belief that sequels suck is not axiomatic any more, not since the Godfather. And Terminator 2 of course.

 

Almost every example of a remake seems to end up a ghastly misadventure motivated by corporate greed. Yojimbo was not remade as A Fistful of Dollars – that was a rip-off! It was made by a genius so it seems to stand on its own but no it has to be disallowed. Gibson’s Payback was fair enough but not at all in the league of Lee Marvin’s Point blank. Most remakes do not even get to that point. In India Don and Agneepath are examples of “decent enough, but why?”

 

 

Is it because cinema is such a young art form that retelling an established tale is so difficult? Do the parameters of the craft close off alternative meanings and readings; the frame closes off divergence perhaps? Or is it that good filmmakers prefer to be original by instinct?

 

 

Lots of questions.

 

 

 

 

Rohit Arya is an Author, Yogi and Polymath, being a writer, a corporate trainer, a mythologist and a vibrant speaker.  He has written the first book on Vaastu to be published in the West, {translated into five European languages} the first book on Tarot to be published in India, co-authored a book on fire sacrifice, and is the creator of The Sacred India Tarot {82 card deck and book}. He was the Editor of The Leadership Review, and on the advisory panel of Indiayogi.com, the first spiritual portal in the country. Currently he is the Director of Pro-Factor, a leadership and change facilitation outfit. He has been an arts critic and socio-cultural commentator for over two decades. Rohit is also a Lineage Master in the Eight Spiritual Breaths system of Yoga. He leads the Ka Sangha meditation group, as well as The Integral Space meditation circle each week.

 

Review of Complete/ Convenient by Ketan Bhagat

Complete/ Convenient

There is more to men than bromance

 

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Finally we get a book about the NRI experience that is not rarefied in literary unapproachability or debased to the aunty fantasies that constitute the oeuvre of Karan Johar. The debut novel by Ketan Bhagat, may not be considered great, but it is definitely a pioneering effort and more importantly he employs prose in a sturdy, workmanlike manner. That is more difficult than most people realize and is always praiseworthy. Urban India is finally reaching towards adult psychological maturity and this book is a milestone in that long overdue process.

 

Ketan is the sibling of bestselling author Chetan Bhagat. He deals with that particular monkey on his shoulder with an instinctive sense of humor and also, grace. What I personally liked a lot was his breezy candidness about Indian sexuality – or rather the furtive, fervid desire that is always present and can never be talked about. He also bluntly peels back the complete lack of boundaries in personal space that exist in Indian families, the erroneous and optimistic assumptions that drive interactions and an instinctive, automatic script that powers every action. Indians whine about these things in private; Bhagat has decided to bring them out into the light of day; it is an act of courage. I am sure he is going to get a lot of flak for saying ‘such things’.

 

His protagonist is an ordinary married man with an ordinary job. The story is basically a life being lived out. This is so unusual in Indian writing as to border on a miracle. I wont get into the plot and characters, for that is tantamount to spoilers. I will merely say they are extremely authentic, especially in their syntax. Bhagat has a good ear for rhythms of Indian speech.

 

 

The other significant point is the manner in which he approaches the Other, the perceived promised land that is residence in a first world country. He knows, only too well, all the attractive seductions of comfort and convenience, the sheer wonder of a society that functions dammit! He also knows, and humorously, even compassionately, recounts the many adjustments and difficulties that assimilation calls for. It is entirely without preachment or self satisfaction; the situation is weird enough to be amusing and instructive and Bhagat is sharp enough to see both simultaneously and even enjoy it.

 

This is a convincing debut novel.

 

The book is almost 375 pages long but it is a brisk read. It is also very moderately priced at 195 INR. Shristi Publishers have brought it out. Available at bookstores or on the Net. More info at www.ketanbhagat.com

 

 

Rohit Arya is an Author, Yogi and Polymath, being a writer, a corporate trainer, a mythologist and a vibrant speaker.  He has written the first book on Vaastu to be published in the West, {translated into five European languages} the first book on Tarot to be published in India, co-authored a book on fire sacrifice, and is the creator of The Sacred India Tarot {82 card deck and book}. He was the Editor of The Leadership Review, and on the advisory panel of Indiayogi.com, the first spiritual portal in the country. Currently he is the Director of Pro-Factor, a leadership and change facilitation outfit. He has been an arts critic and socio-cultural commentator for over two decades. Rohit is also a Lineage Master in the Eight Spiritual Breaths system of Yoga. He leads the Ka Sangha meditation group, as well as The Integral Space meditation circle each week.

 

 

Who is Kamala Devi and where is she now?

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Kamala Devi seems to have been the first Indian Actress to work steadily in Hollywood. Persis Khambatta had a brief Star Trek and shaven head vogue. Aishwarya Rai worked in awful productions – The Last Legion and Pink Panther 2 as sufficient exhibits. Frieda Pinto is the only real genuine break out.  Sabu was a star for a while, Kabir Bedi tried, and Om Puri and Irfan Khan get character work. Kamala Devi however was a leading lady in many movies and some TV; her Wiki page  has details  – but who is she? And where is she now? Born Mumbai 1934, twice divorced; played an American Indian in Geronimo {1962} in what should be a more celebrated irony.

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But we know really nothing. Like the many leading ladies of Spaghetti westerns, she is there, she is pretty and exotic and now we have no idea. But how does a girl called Kamala Devi born in Mumbai in the 1930s end up being a minor Hollywood star in the 1960s?

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The world is strange – a wonderful thing.

 

Rohit Arya is a writer, a corporate trainer, a mythologist and a vibrant speaker. He has been an arts and cultural critic and social commentator for two decades. Rohit is the author of 4 books and been published in 5 European languages. He is an Author, Yogi, Polymath. Rohit is also a Lineage Master in the Eight Spiritual Breaths system of Yoga

 

Rohit Arya on Alina Szapocznikow 1926 – 1973

Sculpture Undone { works from 1955 – 1972}

 
An artists’ biography is supposed to be irrelevant to the work. The only question of anything claiming to be artistic is – does it work? Does it make the viewer, the experiencer, shift in consciousness a bit? The artist is of interest but should not be of central import to the art itself. These are the standard givens… and I find them a little difficult to accept fully. Does it really not matter that Arthur Koestler was, and Roman Polanski is, a rapist? That Dali and Picasso were as close to being demonic as did not matter without actual hooves and horns? It can be argued that what an artist does in private life does not really have any import on the quality of the work – truly great poets have been fascists and racists and innumerable artists have proved to be congenital asses in anything other than their work. Shaw has tackled this question too in the preface to The Doctor’s Dilemma. If for a moment we rule out personal actions where does that leave personal experiences? What has happened to an artist, is that germane, even if we ignore what they do? Such thoughts began to clatter around in my mind when I saw some works by Alina Szapocznikow, {1926-1973} a Polish artist who was also a survivor of the Holocaust. They are first rate, extraordinary work, but how do we blank out what we know, how do we presume she did not have it burn in her consciousness each moment?
Considering she died in 1973 the extraordinary freshness of her output is notable. It is obvious she is flitting with multiple genres simultaneously, pop art, surrealism, new realism, and the sheer sexual candour is bracing in any day or age. These works are funny, they bite, they comment, they mirror. It is socio-political manoeuvring without any overt agenda gravitas. Polyester resin casts and polyurethane forms are the basic materiel but the breezy and witty manner she works with are marvels. All the conceptual robustness and skill do not mask the central issue – at least for me – can such a person’s art ever be anything but autobiographical. Lips are repeated again and again, in counterpoise to the fearful silence that descended upon Europe in its nightmare years. Tellingly they are shaped as lamps… it gives you a terrible punch as you contemplate the implications. Light, free speech and thought even courage were almost extinguished in the heart of the apparently most civilized segment of the globe…
The gravel which backdrops some pieces, chosen just for texture or for the memory of the rails resting on such gravel beds transporting unsuspecting people to perdition? Figures melt and fuse and fragment, how are we not supposed to recall the chambers where humans were seared down into collectibles? A vagrant breast, lumps of human organs, are they allusions or just neural patterns created by the guilt and shame in the mind of the viewer? Flowers grow out of partial visages – optimism and healing or a frank acknowledgment that Nature is a bitch and its cruelty is as impartial as its beauty? These fragments are terrifying in one sense, for survivors of great pain and trauma cohere their pain into a sanity creating narrative; but specific details, too close remembrance of little things, trivial things like gravel and flowers and scents can cause the entire horror to rush back and overwhelm the mind.
For something that is essentially aesthetically elegant these works are even more disconcerting as allusive talons.

Rohit Arya is a writer, a corporate trainer, a mythologist and a vibrant speaker. He has been an arts and cultural critic and social commentator for two decades. Rohit is the author of 4 books and been published in 5 European languages. He is an Author, Yogi, Polymath. Rohit is also a Lineage Master in the Eight Spiritual Breaths system of Yoga

On Existence and the Creative Response

 

Existence may not conclude as we want;  it may give us what we choose.  In a very generous mood, even how to choose? Want is imperative, instinct, ancient: choice is reason, order, structure a uniquely human response to the casual and uncaring vicissitudes of life.  It may be an anomaly, oft-times an illusion, but it is still a cogent action, wrestling with the chaos of instinct, deriving meaning, significance and sometimes, with fortune, remembrance even unto posterity. Such is the hesitant hope that nestles like a snoozing tiger in aesthetic effort, in every creative endeavor that is risked; even foreshadowed to disappointment, there may be compensations, perhaps transcendence. Nobody would risk originality without instinctive hope of reward. Not now, not in the future but ultimately.

 

We project a sense of justice upon the world. We expect endurance in things, objects, people, a streak of fortune, even merely the absence of pain. When life disappoints with tsunamis, with the unpredictable and grossly improbable, like planes crashing into buildings and garlands detonating the innocence of an entire polity – then even the banal and trivial setbacks of the ordinary day that we know from experience lurk maliciously for us, they rise to the grandeur of tragedy.  Is it the meaning of all this chaotic surprise that there is no meaning except what we grasp and wrench out of existence. Perhaps that is sufficient: it may count as victory: even as happiness.

Completion may not be satisfaction, may not be repletion, but it can be right, appropriate. Sometimes superb. To be aesthetically callisthenic for its own sake is a temptation; authenticity requires not just self control but also a sense of proportion. Things may be too huge and interconnected and nuanced to convey fully; to accept what is possible is not a compromise with limitation but the good sense of creative choice. The comforting and familiar sets us on guard, it is anesthetic. Neither can it nourish or push thinking. It is easy to slide into the pervasive grey, the arid hopelessness; to create beauty and nevertheless not be willfully blind to the fangs of life, that takes doing, is worth doing. This implies some sort of courage and at least segments of a new vocabulary; to claim invention of a new language is part of the old problem. Enticement is grand when evoked in a viewer; to succumb oneself is less so. Vitality is often confused with frenzy as celebrity is with integrity.

Attention is a choice no matter the external seductive imperatives. To be conscious and aware allows the construction of meaning, a singular not a plural experience, but usually a rewarding one too, because it is constructed from your experience. The relentless desire to be distracted implies a deeper layer of significance struggling to surface, ignored because it seems to bring pain with it. The simple and harsh may nurture, transform, may turn out to be multilayered and invigorating in a way the complex and intricate could fail at. What is of value need not always be effulgent. So long as it illuminates the possibilities of being human, being alive, it can be as dark as it needs to be

Rohit Arya is a writer, a corporate trainer, a mythologist and a vibrant speaker. He has been an arts and cultural critic and social commentator for two decades. Rohit is the author of 5 books and been published in 5 European languages. He is an Author, Yogi, Polymath. Rohit is also a Lineage Master in the Eight Spiritual Breaths system of Yoga

 

 

 

Please, sit on the crocodile

The Exocarp chair, by Guillermo Bernal, is inspired by reptile skins and the coarse nature of the coverings of avocados and cantaloupes! It is a peculiar object but completely awesome.  Such blending normally does not turn out well from an aesthetic perspective but Bernal has managed to do something striking and original here.

It is above all as sensuous object. This is going to be handled – in an admiring way – like very few chairs are, for the rich sense of tactile promise it conveys visually is bound to be prove irresistible. You have to run your hands over the damn thing! The exposed grain and cut is remarkable.

It does look like the Alien disguised itself and determined to swallow you as you sit, but the sheer vibrant dynamic sense of pulsing organic life is quite extraordinary.

Bernal correctly made a choice to keep it stark and light. Natural colors would have ruined this; he is taking camouflage and making it flamboyant, instead of concealing. It also, unexpectedly reveals just how adverse for survival light colors  can be in Nature. That sense of adversity and discomfort, danger and violence is stark along the spine as seen above

but when you sit, you are encased in smoothness  – though good posture is needed. To slump in this is not only unthinkable it seems impossible.

This is design of high caliber, quirky, superbly functional and impressive.

 

Rohit Arya is a writer , speaker and corporate trainer. He has been a cultural critic and social commentator for two decades. Rohit is the author of 5 books and been published in 5 European languages. He is an Author, Yogi, Polymath.